Things Recently Learned

GeWBHGWbTiOyvO8WAVjayANo, this blog is not turning into “Cille’s Cello Journey” but it could easily become that if I am not careful.  I can say, though, that since I started lessons in September 2017, I have learned a few things:

  1. You are never too old to learn something new.
  2. New things introduce you to new people thus open the door for new opportunities.
  3. It’s ok to realize you will never be Yo-Yo Ma but you might, with effort, turn out to be a decent ensemble member in time.
  4. Young adult musicians, while having extraordinary talent, are a lot of fun to be around. They are also polite, gracious, humble, giving, and many days, just plain funny. Laughter is a very good thing.
  5. Trying new things may be the ladder you need to climb out of your rut.
  6. Young adults need experienced adults at times to offer guidance. Young adults are pretty good at giving guidance, too.  It is all about listening. Praying together is not a bad thing either.
  7. Sometimes you are just going to squeak! I just try to tell myself when that happens that the mouse who lives inside my cello is having a rough day!
  8. Sometimes you work beyond your capabilities – seriously – what possessed me to order both the Bach Cello Suites AND the Popper Etudes this month? The real question, though, is whether or not doing this was a bad thing? I can pick out the notes in places!
  9. Sometimes when YOU try something new it encourages SOMEONE ELSE to try something new and helps them deal with stuff in their lives and encourages them, too.
  10. It’s a very good day when you realize for the first time in a while that you are passionate about something.

You do find out a lot about yourself.  You are reminded that your gifts are different from the gifts God gave to others and that is OK.  You are reminded it takes all of us regardless of our gifts working together to accomplish what God wants and expects from us. You are reminded that because you are not the best at doing one thing, chances are you are a superior talent in another.

I like Romans 12:3-5 for it reminds me that God always had a plan for my gifts which, frankly, will never be as a professional musician. But God can use this opportunity in my life and my gifts to open doors for others (all while I get to enjoy this season of learning and  being passionate about something new!)

“For by the grace given me I say to every one of you: Do not think of yourself more highly than you ought, but rather think of yourself with sober judgment, in accordance with the faith God has distributed to each of you. For just as each of us has one body with many members, and these members do not all have the same function,  so in Christ we, though many, form one body, and each member belongs to all the others. We have different gifts, according to the grace given to each of us. If your gift is prophesying, then prophesy in accordance with your faith; if it is serving, then serve; if it is teaching, then teach;  if it is to encourage, then give encouragement; if it is giving, then give generously; if it is to lead, do it diligently; if it is to show mercy, do it cheerfully.”

My suggestion to you is to pursue your passion, whatever it is, and use the gifts God has given you to expand your horizons. Chances are you will open doors for others and doors will be opened for you.

Still Choosing Joy

Cille

3 Comments

  1. Julie Phillips says:

    Really enjoyed this! Thanks for sharing. Julie

    On Tue, Jul 24, 2018 at 9:06 PM Cille Litchfield wrote:

    > Cille Litchfield posted: “No, this blog is not turning into “Cille’s Cello > Journey” but it could easily become that if I am not careful. I can say, > though, that since I started lessons in September 2017, I have learned a > few things: You are never too old to learn something new.” >

  2. Stacy says:

    Cille thank you for this blog and reminding us that yes God has given each of us talents – and yes he has has (even though some of us have to sometimes wonder what ours are) Well written and very much an inspiration.

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